Mind Power

Two Stories of Will, Focus and Healing
Author: Heidi Smith
Photographer: Paulina Amador

Sir Robert Jones

When Sir Robert Jones visited the emergency room at St. Peter’s Hospital three and a half years ago, the medical staff became immediately concerned about his condition. At 6’6” he could easily carry a certain amount of extra weight, but this was different. He was retaining water and his stomach had swollen to a point where he felt “like I was twenty-four months pregnant.” Reluctantly, Jones checked himself in to undergo a barrage of tests. The results that came back were ominous: his heart was in trouble. If he did not receive a heart transplant within six days, doctors told him, he would die.

Chris Dacek

Chris Dacek sensed that something was wrong. At 38 years old, he knew it shouldn’t take him half an hour to load the recycling into his truck and he shouldn’t need to stop for twenty minute naps while driving home from work. He rationalized his fears away, attributing his increasing shortness of breath to his smoking habit, but found it harder to ignore the weight gain. “I’m a big guy,” says Dacek, who is 6’3”. “But one of the pivotal points was when I noticed that I couldn’t see my ankles. That really bugged me. I kind of missed them.” A local doctor ran an EKG. Upon her return, she had an air of great gentleness about her. “You need to go to the hospital right now,” she said. When he told her he would drive himself there, she said, “No, you need to have someone else drive you.” Though he didn’t know it yet, Dacek’s heart was functioning at twenty percent of its capacity.

The Road Less Traveled

Thus far, these are not uncommon stories. Similar news has been delivered to 4.8 million Americans, with 400,000 new cases occurring every year. What’s different is how Jones and Dacek responded. Both are long-time students at Ramtha’s School of Enlightenment, where they have been trained in techniques for self-generated healing. Faced with the ultimate challenge to their health, they decided to apply what they had learned.They would work with their doctors to learn all they could about the nature of their condition; they would take the pills the doctors prescribed to support their bodies through the healing process; but ultimately, they would use the power of focused, willful thought to bring about physical change.

A Mind of His Own

For Jones, the first step was telling his doctors to precisely document his progress – because he was going to heal his heart. “I told them I appreciated what they had found, but I was not going to go [the transplant] route.” When a heart specialist asked how he intended to accomplish this, Jones simply told him, “With the disciplines I’ve been taught and with my mind.” “If people could do that I would not have a profession,” the specialist responded.

It was the beginning of a long journey. Every day, Jones would visit one or the other of his doctors for blood tests, EKGs and an endless array of other tests. At times, he could not take five steps without gasping for air. “I was scared to lie down, because every time I did I would be choking. I couldn’t breathe, and so I had to sleep sitting up,” he says. However, at the same time he constantly envisioned himself healed. “I connected to my DNA in my mind,” he says. “I started doing it every day, all day.”

One of the first medical professionals to see Jones was Kathleen May, F.N.P. of Yelm Family Medicine. “I’ve never seen anyone with such a conscious intent that their body was going to be healed,” she says. “Despite the horrible conclusion from mainstream medicine that he needed a heart transplant, he never waivered in his focus. He didn’t wallow in self pity or victimization.” May has long been aware of the mind’s powerful impact, for better or worse, in the healing process. “I’ve observed that I can have two different people with the same diagnosis and have two opposite results.” she says. “Why does one cancer patient die in three weeks and the other one who has the same condition survive for five years? There is something beyond the physical state of the body to explain these results.”

Ultimately, they would use the power of focused, willful thought to bring about physical change.

Having successfully managed the first several months of his recovery without getting a transplant, Jones needed to be taken off of a blood-thinning medication for a few days. Within that short period he had a stroke. In the ambulance on the way to the hospital, the medical team administered a lifesaving drug that could potentially reverse some of the effects of the stroke, such as loss of speech and partial paralysis. “According to hospital specialists in all of the years of administering this drug en route to a hospital,” says May, “they had never before had a complete reversal of symptoms.”

“I couldn’t talk,” says Jones. “I was doing the hand motions to give me the pill. They gave me the pill, and within maybe fifteen minutes, I could talk. I said, ‘You can all go home. I’ll be all right.’ And then I couldn’t talk again.” Doctors estimated that he would regain the power of speech in anywhere from three days to six months - or never. Waking up in the emergency room, he surprised the nurse by telling her he was hungry. The next morning, a doctor came to visit him. “He was looking at me really, really strange,” says Jones. “For five or ten minutes he was just looking at my face and checking my face. Then he said, ‘It’s like it never happened. Your face is clear – like it never happened.’”

“Sir Robert was the first example of a complete reversal of symptoms,” says May. “He reported to me that every specialist in the hospital, cardiologists and neurologists came to visit him because they actually wanted to see the first person who had ever had fully and completely reversed their symptoms with this drug.” She continues, “I find it interesting that we’ve had this medication for many years, and there has never been anybody with whom it had fully worked. I attribute that success to Sir Robert, not to the drug.”

I’ve never seen anyone with such a conscious intent that their body was going to be healed,” she says. “Despite the horrible conclusion from mainstream medicine that he needed a heart transplant, he never waivered in his focus.”

Back at home, Jones continued to focus on being well. Regardless of how his body looked or felt, he saw himself as healthy. “I had conversations with my God. I just demanded from my God within me to stand fast and see this body healthy and change the cells in this body to be healthy, continuously. That was the key thing that I did over and over again.” During that time, he disconnected from people and stopped taking calls. That was important he says, “Because people would constantly ask me, ‘How are you doing? You don’t look too good today,’ and I’m endeavoring to hold this mental focus that I’m perfectly healthy and strong. Every time you get something like that, it hits you. If you’re not strong it will really make you kind of wonder.”

After three and a half years of continual daily disciplines to heal himself, one morning Jones woke up and realized, “You know, I don’t need to work on my heart any more. I am healed and I am well.” When he visited his doctors, they were amazed to find he displays none of the symptoms they would expect of someone with his history. “What perplexes the cardiologists is that while he does have a measurable heart condition he is symptom free, like that of a person who does not have heart disease,” says May.

I just demanded from my God within me to stand fast and see this body healthy and change the cells in this body to be healthy, continuously. That was the key thing that I did over and over again.

Time for a Change

When Dacek was admitted to the hospital, he learned that he had congestive heart failure. The seriousness of his situation was brought home by a young technician who took his Echocardiogram. “As she was walking out the door, she turned to me and said, ‘You have a long road ahead of you, but I think you’re going to be okay.’ That was when the bottom sort of fell out,” he says. His roommate discovered him later sitting in a daze, trying to comprehend the news. “It wasn’t supposed to end this way,” Dacek told him. “It wasn’t supposed to be like this.”

After that point, he decided to change. He focused on being healthy, starting with short walks in the hospital’s circular corridors during which he would see himself as well and healed. His legs were so swollen he could barely walk and he had so much water pressing on his lungs that he had trouble breathing, but every day he would walk around the circular corridors of the hospital for twenty minute periods, holding a vision of his heart as perfectly healthy. People in other rooms began to wonder what he was doing. “The nurses would watch me go like a horse in a racing track,” he laughs.

After Dacek was released from the hospital, he continued to focus on wellness. “Every day,” he says. “It’s really important. I remember a friend telling me that you don’t have to be good at something, but if you do it every day, someday you will get good at it. So every day I would see that my heart was healthy.” Along the way he had a revelation. “I realized that I needed to stop talking about my experiences of being sick. I needed to stop telling anecdotes and stories about the hospital.” He felt they only reinforced a reality that he was actively working to change. “It’s really smart to be careful about the stories you tell. If you want to change, you just need to not associate with what you don’t want.”

I realized that I needed to stop talking about my experiences of being sick. I needed to stop telling anecdotes and stories about the hospital.

Change was the key to his recovery. Prior to his illness, he admits to frequently feeling lonely. “I had gotten myself to a place where I was just unhappy. I was working at a restaurant and I was working nights. I’d get up in the morning and my roommates would be at school and work, and then I’d go to work and come home and they’d be in bed. So my normal day to day life was just kind of lonely,” he says. Once he’d been diagnosed, the outpouring of support he received reminded him that he did, in fact, have friends.

And then he fell in love. Since he could no longer work, his weekends suddenly freed up and while attending a child’s birthday party one Saturday afternoon, he spotted the woman he’d been admiring from afar for five years. Emboldened by his brush with death, he asked her out. She said yes. “Falling in love has been a big help with this,” says Dacek. “I know you always live for yourself, but it really helps if there is someone else there to love and to have a reason to go forward, a reason to change.”

In June, 2008, Dacek called his cardiologist’s office. The results of his latest echocardiogram had arrived, and he wanted to discuss the possibility of getting off of some of his medications. The nurse checked his records and called him back. She told him that his pulmonary test was fine, his blood test showed no toxicity and according to his echocardiogram - his heart was normal.

When I look at future things I want to change, especially healings, it doesn’t seem so daunting any more

“I sat there for a second, and then I said, ‘Can you explain to me what you mean by that? Normal for somebody who almost died in October, or -?’ She said no, your heart is now the normal size for you or anyone like you, and it’s beating strong. I said, ‘Thank you very much for calling me.’”

The Road Ahead

Both Jones and Dacek find that their success in surmounting such formidable health conditions has given them confidence in addressing future issues. After working on his heart for three and a half years, Jones has since used the same level of focus to address secondary impacts on his thyroid, liver and kidneys. “I used the same process for all of it,” he says. Dacek finds the possibility of change less intimidating than he once did. “When I look at future things I want to change, especially healings, it doesn’t seem so daunting any more,” he says. Both also emphasize that while they were using their minds to deal with their physical conditions, they also supported their bodies by taking the medications their doctors prescribed. However, in keeping with their intent, they aim to wean themselves off of the drugs as quickly as possible, rather than staying on them permanently.

To anyone who receives a prognosis like his, Jones has a few words of advice. “Believe in your mind. Your mind can only produce what you believe it can produce. And believe in your God and don’t be scared to demand help. Not ask for help, but demand help. I didn’t ask, I demanded and evoked my God to make it so. I don’t care if they believe in God or Jesus – I don’t care if it’s a cactus plant. If that’s what they believe in, demand it to come forth and give you what you need to rejuvenate your body.”

I don’t care if they believe in God or Jesus – I don’t care if it’s a cactus plant. If that’s what they believe in, demand it to come forth and give you what you need to rejuvenate your body.

For her part, May has been honored to participate in Jones’ recovery and inspired by the level of commitment and responsibility he displayed for his healing. “What I have observed are people literally dropping their bodies off to me, saying, find out what’s wrong and fix it because I don’t feel good. When I try to engage them in a conversation of where the disease started and what they can do to change it they’re not interested. It is always surprising to me how many people don’t take responsibility for their own health.” Jones was the opposite. “I’d never seen a human being so committed and disciplined.”

While Jones and Dacek are remarkable cases, May believes that taking responsibility for your own health and recovery is something anyone can do. “For over twenty-five years, the patients in my practice who have said ‘No, I don’t accept this,’ and have, not out of fear but out of strong resolve, declared, ‘I am going to find out everything I can about my body, take care of it, love it, nurture it, and support it’ live longer than the folks who don’t take on that attitude. Attitude has a huge impact on healing. So whatever diagnosis anyone is ever given, regardless of the statistics, you can go beyond that in living longer and even reversing it.”

Attitude has a huge impact on healing. So whatever diagnosis anyone is ever given, regardless of the statistics, you can go beyond that in living longer and even reversing it.