You Can See the Future

IN THIS ISSUE WINTER 2010- 2011

Interview with Mike Wright
Author: Danielle Graham

Beyond intuition and remote viewing lies an additional level of perceiving future information: The ability to see the future clearly and with eyes open. Developing the neurological connections between the parts of the brain that “perceive” (generally located in the limbic areas of the brain), and the parts of the brain that “see” (the occipital lobe) requires persistence, patience, and repetition of a simple technique that can instantly reveal the accuracy of the “seen” information. Students at Ramtha’s School of Enlightenment [RSE] develop this ability by using a deck of playing cards.

Imagine opening up a brand new deck of playing cards, shuffling the deck well, then placing the entire stack of playing cards in front of you face down. Next, cover the deck completely with a blank card or piece of paper. What is the card that lies at the top of the deck directly under the cover? Don’t guess: See it.

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You Can See the Future - Interview with Mike Wright

Perhaps there is one other element required to develop the skill of “seeing” the future (which in this case is the top card of the deck), and that is a deep and profound acceptance that it is possible to do so.

Meet Mike Wright, an appointed teacher at RSE: He doesn’t merely “believe” he can see the future clearly and accurately, he knows he can and that the same ability is developable within everyone. As a teacher, he enthusiastically enjoys demonstrating his developing ability and encourages his audience to take on the challenge for themselves.

SuperConsciousness spoke with Wright about his journey of acceptance and how this ability has added value in his life.


SC: Why use a deck of cards to develop the ability to see information from the future?

MW: I have found that training with a deck of cards is the most convenient way to get useful feedback on my ability to perceive the future as an overlay on the present environment.

SC: How so?

MW: I can pull out a deck of cards in almost any situation, any time that I choose. I don’t have to create a special appointment. I don’t need a special occasion or any special circumstances either.

You Can See the Future - Interview with Mike Wright

First of all, a simple deck of cards provides me with a point of focus in which I can practice detaching myself from the busyness of any environment, instead of responding and reacting to whatever circumstances exist around me at any given time. In that state of detachment, and with the desire to accurately forecast the face of the next card, I begin to perceive the card’s information visually. I can then immediately check the validity or relative accuracy of my perception.

I used to be an Air Force F-16 fighter pilot and pilot instructor. Developing greater perception using a deck of playing cards is in many ways not that much different to the pilot eye-training exercises I used years ago to improve my ability to perceive further in the distance whether daytime, nighttime, or in any weather.

SC: How do you learn to eliminate distractions from the environment?

MW: I have taken the time to study neonatal sensory development research in the scientific literature, specifically psychological and neurological. As a pilot, vision is a big thing. Humans are visual dominant mammals, say compared to dogs in which smell is the dominant sense. What I learned from the study of vision development was that it is very similar to other sensory development during human growth.

If I’m only consciously using 5% of my brain, then there is another 95% that I haven’t learned how to consciously use yet. Whatever I am capable of seeing, I always assume there is another 95% I have not yet developed the ability to see, that I haven’t experienced yet.

My logic was that if I want to continue to extend my ability to perceive, then I could use the foundation of the neonatal literature I studied and just apply it to adult situations, and in this instance, extending my perception in time.

Progressive development in neonates is that they see a little bit further, see a bit clearer, and then they begin to distinguish shapes. They see black and white before they begin to see color.

Also, there is feedback based on trial and error, but it is not a random trial and error. It is purposeful with instant feedback. If the result is consistent, the next step is to determine whether it is useful consistency or not. That’s the way infants learn.

They begin by exploring their immediate environment, which expands from mom’s breast to mom’s eyes, then to that face behind mom to a little bit further out. At some point the child’s perception extends far enough to catch that furry, four-legged thing going by. That is how we first perceive our environment, explore it, then gain the feedback from our efforts, and this development process is well understood and reported in scientific journals. I simply decided to extend the application of that knowledge beyond convention.

You Can See the Future - Interview with Mike Wright

Also, I know that if I am going to train one particular sensory channel in the brain with an effort that requires intrinsic will, then I am going to have to take my attention off all other sensory inputs. I achieve that by resting my gaze on a fixed point which then begins to induce a subtle trance state. I learned from the science of hypnosis that one way to induce a light trance state is through autohypnosis. So, I purposely begin to tune out the environment wherever I am, whether it is the airport lounge, the hotel lobby, or my house.

Also, I don’t add any extra insulators like music or my iPod. Sometimes the worst environmental conditions are the best places to train to enter into a trance. I may not get the best results that day in perceiving the cards accurately, but I know I am challenging my neurology to deal with complex environmental circumstances.

By extending what I had previously learned about the neurology and psychology of early childhood development into the practice of seeing a playing card accurately before turning it over to determine the accuracy of my perception of a future event in time, I began to receive perceptions or subtle impressions of the face of that card.

SC: Is it like an inner knowingness?

MW: I intentionally ignore knowingness to purposefully develop actual visual sight of the playing card face. What I am working to develop is a much more objective visual environmental overlay that utilizes the visual cortex, instead of only subjective impressions.

When I fix my gaze on the back of a covered playing card and my desire is to know what is on the face of that card, it becomes my objective to actually see what is on the face of the card. I then turn the card over to confirm whether or not I perceived the information correctly.

To me, this is very much like looking at my email inbox. I’m looking for a very specific piece of information, for instance, an email from my mom. If I don’t have an email from my mom in the inbox, then I am going to move on to another program. I am waiting for the email from my mom and I am not going to open any other emails because any other email would not have the information that I want. It’s just like with my computer: I don’t just get an “impression” that she may have emailed me – I look at the inbox to see if that communication is actually there.

My objective is to achieve seeing accurately both suits and numbers, 52 out of 52, with a brand new, previously unopened deck under any light conditions. I practice with many different decks of cards so that the capacity for me to see is universal and not specific to any one deck.

I am using that primary evolutionary neurological mechanism called vision. I am attempting to extend my vision beyond convention based upon the research I previously mentioned, plus all the other literature that suggests that we have a much broader range of information access than what is traditionally accepted for the five senses. I want to grow and evolve the visual part (the occipital lobe) of my brain’s ability to access information.

The usefulness of a deck of cards to develop that ability is that either I see the card correctly or I don’t. This gives me instantaneous feedback as to whether or not I have successfully tuned out enough environmental noise to have effectively seen and read my mom’s email, so to speak.

SC: It’s not guessing?

MW: Guessing is not seeing.

SC: Why would you want to develop this skill? What is the usefulness of seeing the future of a playing card?

MW: Developing another level of perception, of information access is its own reward.

SC: What do you see?

You Can See the Future - Interview with Mike Wright

MW: I will have a period where I can consistently see the suits, but the numbers are off. Other times I might see the numbers more clearly, but the suits are off. My objective is to achieve seeing accurately both suits and numbers, 52 out of 52, with a brand new, previously unopened deck under any light conditions. I practice with many different decks of cards so that the capacity for me to see is universal and not specific to any one deck.

It all began with my first, irrefutable experience. I was looking over the shoulder of someone who was demonstrating to a crowd of students. I looked at the top of the deck and said out loud that it was the king of clubs, but the visual image of the card was so crisp, I thought he had already turned the card over, but he hadn’t. I had clearly seen the future of the card before it was turned over for confirmation. More importantly, I had actually called it out loud.

SC: It wasn’t just an intuitive impression?

MW: No, it was visual. Like I said, I thought he had already flipped the card over. That experience was all visual cortex.

We just simply haven’t yet developed the visual cortex to the point of being able to process all of the other information that is available in the environment. The information is always there; it’s already in the inbox. All we have to do is click on it. What I’m doing is developing that access neurologically. If I am patient, the information will come. That is all I have to do. That is the secret.

For me, that is neonatal perceptual development, and I still consider myself a neonate. If I’m only consciously using 5% of my brain, then there is another 95% that I haven’t learned how to consciously use yet. Whatever I am capable of seeing, I always assume there is another 95% I have not yet developed the ability to see, that I haven’t experienced yet.

The usefulness of a deck of cards to develop that ability is that either I see the card correctly or I don’t. This gives me instantaneous feedback as to whether or not I have successfully tuned out enough environmental noise.

SC: Can you provide some examples of how developing your visual cortex to access information beyond the ordinary perception of time and space has become useful to you?

MW: First of all, it has eradicated the doubt that I used to deal with when it came to intuition and/or gut feelings. In the past, if I had a flash of insight about something, I wouldn’t always trust its accuracy or know what to do with the information.

All my life I have been getting information about the future, but I didn’t know whether or not I could trust it. Oftentimes, I didn’t choose to act on the information. Now, when I receive information in any form, I can evaluate its relative accuracy and relative usefulness, and this helps me to build outrageous confidence.

SC: Do you have any practical examples?

MW: I know which elevator is going to open in the lobby before I get there. I can go and stand in front of the elevator and I don’t push a button.

SC: But lots of people claim they use their knowingness to find, for example, parking places. How is this different?

MW: I was recently at a Hilton I had never stayed at before. I checked in for the first time. I got my key but didn’t know where the elevator was. The concierge directed me towards a hallway and told me to turn left.

I walked down the hallway in that direction, and all of a sudden, before I reached the left turn for the elevators, I saw clearly, as if overlaid on the hallway like a very clear “mirage,” that when I turned left, I would be standing in front of six elevators, three on the left and three on the right. I also visually saw that the middle elevator on my right would be the next one to open.

Once I reached the elevator hallway, I turned left, and indeed, there were six elevators, three on the left and three on the right. I walked towards the middle one on the right and as I approached, the middle elevator door on the right opened.

You Can See the Future - Interview with Mike Wright

SC: How is that different from finding a parking space? What’s the distinction between extending perception or intuition to find a parking space, and being able to clearly see the future as you approach an experience just before you experience it?

MW: Because I am seeing the overlay of the future visually. Visual perception is a learned skill. There’s no effort involved once you achieve a certain level of skill. For instance, it requires no effort to listen to an iPod after it is turned on; we just listen.

A simple deck of cards provides me with a point of focus in which I can practice detaching myself from the busyness of any environment, instead of responding and reacting to whatever circumstances exist around me at any given time. In that state of detachment, and with the desire to accurately forecast the face of the next card, I begin to perceive the card’s information visually.

The same is true with trained visual perception: It is a form of direct knowing that includes visual information streams overlaid on the present environment. In the example of the Hilton elevator, the visual stream occurred fifteen seconds ahead of the experience. I am learning to perceive information that is useful to me without any effort on my part.

The more confident I get with this ability, the deeper the range of perception I have in time, whether seconds extend into minutes, or hours into days. I don’t have the continuity yet, but it is coming.

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